Re-New Your Mind Course by Gerald Crawford

81 Week Course to Re-New Your Mind - Tao Te Ching - The Chinese concept of yin and yang describes nature in daulities with two opposite, complementary, and interdependent forces. In other words, two halves balancing together that make a whole.

Deeper meaning meditation on Tao Te Ching for the next 72 weeks. Chapter 9.1

Deeper meaning meditation on Tao Te Ching. – Week 9.

The Three Treasures of Tao Te Ching – Jing – Creative Energy (The Candel) , Qi – Life-Force Energy (The Flame) , Shen – Spiritual Energy (The Light).

The message that is at the centre of the centre of the Tao Te Ching brought to us by Lao Tzu.

If Jing is the wax and wick of a candle, and Qi its flame, then Shen is the radiance given off by the flame – what allows it to actually be a source of light. And in the same way that the light from a candle depends upon the wax, wick, and flame, so does healthy Shen depend upon the cultivation of Jing and Qi. It is only through the temple of a strong and balanced body that a radiant Spirit can shine.

Shen is the spiritual radiance that can be seen shining through a person’s eyes – the emanation of a universal loving-kindness, compassion and enlightened power; of a heart brimming with wisdom, forgiveness and generosity.

Read more about the The Three Treasures here….

Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu Chapter 32, The Tao is nameless

Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu Chapter 32, The Tao is nameless


The Tao is nameless and unchanging.
Although it appears insignificant,
nothing in the world can contain it.
Smaller than an electron,
it contains uncountable galaxies.
 
If powerful men and women
could remain centred in the Tao,
all things would be in harmony.
The world would become a paradise.
All people would be at peace,
not by official decree,
but by their own goodness.
 
Once the whole is divided, the parts need names.
There are already enough names;
know when to stop.
When you have names and forms,
know that they are provisional.
When you have institutions,
know where their functions should end.
Knowing when to stop,
you can avoid any danger.
 
All things end in the Tao
just as the small streams and the largest rivers
flow through valleys to the sea.

This verse again points us to the Tao, the elusive yet all-pervasive, unnameable source of all that is. When we lose touch with our source, conflict, violence, confusion and despair arise. Sadly, most people live their lives completely unaware of their source and so are like fish washed upon the shore, struggling and distressed, desperately gasping for breath. They look for their ‘fix’ in all the wrong places; empty consumerism, deadening media and hollow social interactions.

If people could remain centred in the Tao, they would be in harmony with everything and we could quite conceivably transform our world into a paradise. If enough people began living in alignment with the Tao, then it is possible we could reach a critical mass, enabling this mode of being to spread outward like a wave, inspiring and influencing people all across the world and in every walk of life.

Embodying that which is highest and best within us enables others to do likewise. We will all eventually return to the Tao. This is an inevitability. But why wait until we’ve shed the physical body? Why not return to the Tao now, while we are still alive, and witness how doing so can transform everything; ourselves, our lives, and the world itself.

Lao Tzu also suggests that we learn to stop naming things. The world is whole; there are no divisions. The mind by its very nature seeks to divide things and creates separation where none truly exists. We plaster names on things and then believe that we know the thing. In truth, we’ve just reduced reality to an assortment of words and labels and are experiencing life through a screen of conceptualization.

Practice living in a non-verbal world. Go for a walk and instead of mentally labelling everything (“sky”, “tree”, “flower”, “dog”) just witness things as they are. Perceive sights, sounds, textures, tastes and smells. Be open, alive and as attentive as if this were your first day upon the earth. This is a hugely effective and enjoyable exercise that enables us to break free of deadening conceptualization, bringing us back in touch with life.

Please send us an e-mail to request the download link to the MP3 file. – E-mail: info@renewyourmind.co.za.

Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu Chapter 31, Violence will never bring peace

Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu Chapter 31, Violence will never bring peace


Weapons are the tools of violence;
a decent man will avoid them
except in the direst necessity
and, if compelled, will use them
only with the utmost restraint.
 
Peace is his highest value.
If peace is his true objective
how can he rejoice in the victory of war?
His enemies are not demons,
but human beings, like himself.
He doesn’t wish them personal harm.
Nor does he rejoice in victory.
How could he rejoice in victory
and delight in the slaughter of men?
 
With the slaughter of multitudes,
we have grief and sorrow.
Every victory is a funeral;
when you win a war,
you celebrate by mourning.

This uncompromising verse has a simple and clear message: peace is to be our highest objective and war is to be avoided at all costs. Even if we are on the winning side of a war, so much death and suffering has been inflicted on both sides that the end result can only be grief and suffering. This message is as relevant now as it ever has been. War is not the way forward and all tools of violence must be set aside.

One of the biggest evils in the world is that of dehumanisation. We demonize our enemies, reducing them to mere caricatures in our minds, thus legitimising our will to fight and kill them. We have to go beyond the labels, stereotypes and generalisations that we plaster over other people and recognize our innate oneness, celebrating all that we share in common and letting go of our perceived differences.

We can put this verse into practice by making a commitment to end all the acts of violence that we casually and often unthinkingly perpetrate in our daily lives. Such acts might include speaking or behaving unkindly or aggressively to another person, being thoughtless or impatient, or dehumanizing another human being by labeling them in some way. Instead we can replace all such acts of violence, however slight they might seem, with conscious acts of peace, kindness and compassion. This is living the Tao.

Please send us an e-mail to request the download link to the MP3 file. – E-mail: info@renewyourmind.co.za.

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81 Week Course to Re-New Your Mind - Tao Te Ching - The Chinese concept of yin and yang describes nature in daulities with two opposite, complementary, and interdependent forces. In other words, two halves balancing together that make a whole.