Re-New Your Mind Course by Gerald Crawford

81 Week Course to Re-New Your Mind - Tao Te Ching - The Chinese concept of yin and yang describes nature in daulities with two opposite, complementary, and interdependent forces. In other words, two halves balancing together that make a whole.

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Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu Chapter 19, Embrace simplicity

Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu Chapter 19, Embrace simplicity


Give up sainthood, renounce wisdom
and the people will be a hundred times happier.
Throw away morality and justice
and people will do the right thing.
Throw away industry and profit
and there will be no thieves.
 
All of these are superficial outward forms alone;
they are not sufficient in themselves.
Just stay at the centre of the circle
and let all things take their course.
 
It is more important
to see the simplicity,
to realise one’s true nature,
to cast off selfishness
and temper desire.

At first glance, this might appear to be a strange verse. Is Lao Tzu really asking us to relinquish sainthood and renounce wisdom, to dispense with morality and justice?

This makes no sense until you realise that in striving to achieve sainthood, wisdom, morality and justice we are buying into the notion that these are external things, separate from who and what we are and so we build structures and maps to help us find them.

Such notions are based on misperception. We become like an absent-minded man searching everywhere for his hat, creating all kinds of maps, diagrams and blueprints to help him find the hat – or to create new hats! – not realising that it’s been sitting on his head the whole time. In fact, if you were to take the analogy to its full completion, he would would eventually realise that not only does he already have a hat, but he is the hat!

Where there is love, there is no need of ‘morals’, because love always does the right thing.

When we are in touch with the Tao and know who and what we are, there is no need to try to be ‘saintly’; we give from the heart effortlessly, because it’s the nature of our being to do so. We have no need of industry or profit, because we are whole and at peace with whatever we’ve got.

Please send us an e-mail to request the download link to the MP3 file. – E-mail: info@renewyourmind.co.za.

Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu Chapter 18, Intellectualism breeds hypocrisy

Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu Chapter 18, Intellectualism breeds hypocrisy


When the greatness of the Tao is present,
action arises from one’s own heart.
When the greatness of the Tao is absent,
action comes from the rules
of “kindness and justice”.
If you need rules to be kind and just,
this is a sure sign that virtue is absent.
When intellectualism arises,
hypocrisy is close behind.
 
When kinship falls into discord,
piety and rites of devotion arise.
When there is strife in the family,
people talk of “brotherly love”.
When the country falls into chaos,
patriotism is born.

The laws and rules of society are designed to make people “good citizens”, to enforce “kindness and justice”. However, the need to impose such rules creates an artificiality and superficiality. Unless one can give from the heart rather than because of expectation and written or unwritten rules, it is better not to give at all.

If kindness and goodness have to be forced and manufactured, then their lack of authenticity is more corrosive than it is beneficial. If one could simply return to the Source, to live from the Tao, then there would be no need for rules, regulations and measures of expectation.

Lao Tzu simply but powerfully points out that when alignment with the Tao is absent, society will be overloaded with rules and regulations to try and make the people “good”. Intellectualisation breeds hypocrisy, lack of kinship creates a false sense of piety and empty devotional rites, as in the case of most religions. There will be an emphasis on “blood is thicker than water” and much talk of patriotism and “us versus them”.

There are two ways to view the world: though the eyes of mind and ego or through the eyes of love. Ego sees only separation and in order to build itself up, it grasps hold of notions of family and nationality to try and solidify its tenuous sense of identity. This creates more separation, division, hostility and a dangerous sense of false pride.

Looking at the world through the eyes of love we can relate to life in an altogether less separative manner. We no longer cling to false division, but are free to view all of life as it truly is: inextricably interconnected.

“Countries” are a man-made construct and so, to the Master, patriotism is seen as foolish and dangerously divisive. When we become aware of the oneness of all life, we can extend our love and affection beyond the boundaries of immediate family and can come to see everyone as our brothers and sisters. Our little worlds – and hearts – suddenly expand beyond all previous boundaries, when we realise that love is the highest truth of what we are.

Please send us an e-mail to request the download link to the MP3 file. – E-mail: info@renewyourmind.co.za.

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81 Week Course to Re-New Your Mind - Tao Te Ching - The Chinese concept of yin and yang describes nature in daulities with two opposite, complementary, and interdependent forces. In other words, two halves balancing together that make a whole.