Re-New Your Mind Course by Gerald Crawford

81 Week Course to Re-New Your Mind - Tao Te Ching - The Chinese concept of yin and yang describes nature in daulities with two opposite, complementary, and interdependent forces. In other words, two halves balancing together that make a whole.

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Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu Chapter 24, Those who rush ahead

Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu Chapter 24, Those who rush ahead


Those who stand on tiptoes
do not stand firmly.
Those who rush ahead
do not get very far
Those who try to outshine others
dim their own light.
Those who define themselves
can’t know who they really are.
Those who seek power over others
can’t empower themselves.
Those who boast of their accomplishments
will not endure.
 
When walking the path of the Tao,
these actions are unworthy
and must be left behind.
Just do your job, then let go.

This might be termed the ‘keep your ego in check’ verse.

It’s something we all have to be vigilant about, for the actions spoken of here are things we’ve been brought up to see as signs of power and success: rushing ahead, climing higher, trying to outshine others, creating a solid sense of ego or ‘self’ and displaying our accomplishments so that others can recognize how ‘great’ we are.

However, such behaviours are ultimately self-defeating and very often have the opposite effect than we’d hoped.

Just do your job, Lao Tzu suggests, and let the rest go.

Why the need to constantly fluff up our egos? To spend our lives living in such a way just leaves us exhausted and ultimately unfulfilled. Why not just get on with it and set aside the need to be “better” than others or have our accomplishments or virtue recognized. Let things be as they are.

Please send us an e-mail to request the download link to the MP3 file. – E-mail: info@renewyourmind.co.za.

Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu Chapter 23, Nature uses few words

Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu Chapter 23, Nature uses few words


Express yourself completely, then keep quiet.
Nature uses few words.
Fierce winds do not blow all morning,
a downpour of rain does not last the day.
These are exaggerated, forced effects,
and that is why they cannot be sustained.
If heaven and earth cannot sustain a forced action,
how much less is man able to do so?
 
If you open yourself to the Tao,
you are at one with the Tao
and you can embody it completely.
If you open yourself to insight,
you are at one with insight
and can use it completely.
If you open yourself to loss
you are at one with loss
and you can accept it completely.
 
Open yourself to the Tao,
then trust your natural responses;
and everything will fall into place.

The message of this verse appears to be quite simple: stop trying to force things and just open yourself to the Tao. Let go and allow life to do what it does. Don’t resist it, because it’s going to do what it does regardless.

Sometimes we think that in order to to get where we want to be, we have to struggle, strive and force things. But this will inevitably leave us exhausted and frustrated, for even nature in all its power cannot create a storm that lasts indefinitely.

Forced action cannot be sustained, so it’s better to open ourselves to the Tao, in the manner that preceding verses have suggested. By doing so, we can follow and act upon whatever insights and promptings arise from the stillness within. Actions arising from insight are far more likely to be of benefit than those that are directed by the conditioned egoic mind, which can only ever see a limited part of the picture.

Another important point comes from the very first line, which urges us to express ourselves completely and then keep quiet. It’s very easy to fall into the trap of labouring points and debating our position, when in fact our energies are best served by retreating within once the point has been made.

As a wise friend once said to me: “silence is golden; if you can’t improve upon it, don’t even try.”

Please send us an e-mail to request the download link to the MP3 file. – E-mail: info@renewyourmind.co.za.

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81 Week Course to Re-New Your Mind - Tao Te Ching - The Chinese concept of yin and yang describes nature in daulities with two opposite, complementary, and interdependent forces. In other words, two halves balancing together that make a whole.