81 Week Course to Re-New Your Mind - Tao Te Ching - The Chinese concept of yin and yang describes nature in daulities with two opposite, complementary, and interdependent forces. In other words, two halves balancing together that make a whole.

Category: Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu (Page 1 of 10)

Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu Chapter 21, How do I know where creation comes from

Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu Chapter 21, How do I know where creation comes from


The greatest virtue you can have
comes from following only the Tao.
 
The Tao is elusive and intangible.
Although formless and intangible,
it gives rise to form.
Although vague and elusive,
it gives rise to shapes.
Although dark and obscure,
it is the spirit, the essence,
the life breath of all things.
 
Since the beginning of time, the Tao has
always existed.
It is beyond existing and not existing.
How do I know the way of things?
I look inside myself and see.

Lao Tzu here offers more pointers to realizing the Tao. It’s a tricky business. Try to understand it with words and ideas and you’ll fail, for it’s elusive and beyond all such abstraction.

Try to see it with your eyes and you’ll fail, for it’s intangible and invisible. Yet its existence can be demonstrated, in much the same way as electricity; for although invisible, its effects can readily be observed.

The Tao is like the ocean upon which all currents, waves and forms derive their existence. They rise from the ocean, exist only because of the ocean and then dissolve back into the ocean. It is the substrata out of which all form – the entire manifested universe – is created.

Lao Tzu closes by telling us that although we cannot outwardly see this invisible force independently of its effects, we can know the truth by looking within ourselves.

This is the only place truth can ever be found. Words can deceive, beliefs can be warped and the human mind is ordinarily a repository for all kinds of gross half-truths and distortions.

But beyond the mind – within, we can access the Tao and only from there can we truly understand the way of things.

Please send us an e-mail to request the download link to the MP3 file. – E-mail: info@renewyourmind.co.za.

Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu Chapter 20, I alone am dark

Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu Chapter 20, I alone am dark


Stop thinking and your problems will end.
What difference between yes and no?
What difference between success and failure?
Must you value what others value,
and fear what others fear?
How ridiculous!
 
In spring, some go to the park and climb the terrace,
but I alone am drifting, not knowing where I am.
I alone don’t care,
I alone am expressionless,
like a newborn baby before it has learned to smile.
Other people have more than they need,
I alone possess nothing.
Mine is indeed the mind of an ignoramus
in its unadulterated simplicity.
I am but a guest in this world.
While others rush about to get things done,
I accept what is offered.
I alone seem foolish,
earning little, spending less.
 
Others strive for fame,
I avoid the limelight.
Other people have a purpose;
I alone don’t know.
Indeed, I seem like an idiot;
no mind, no worries.
 
I drift like a wave on the ocean.
I blow as aimless as the wind.
 
All men settle down into their grooves;
I alone am stubborn and remain outside.
But wherein I am most different from others is
in knowing to take sustenance from the great Mother.

For some people, this is not only the longest verse of the Tao Te Ching so far, but perhaps also the most challenging. Lao Tzu paints a portrait of life as a self-realized being and much of what he says runs counter to the ethos of our culture.

Instead of being filled with thoughts, the mind of the Master is empty and because of this, he has no worries. He is but a visitor in this world. Instead of rushing about trying to direct and control the events of his life, always with an eye to achieving and acquiring, he instead blows like the breeze, aimless, free and unencumbered.

Instead of constantly striving, he accepts whatever comes his way. Instead of deriving his sustenance from the things of this world, he takes his nourishment from the great Mother. This is the way of the Tao. Many people would likely be horrified at such a way of life and indeed, as Lao Tzu states, to most he would seem like an idiot. But one of the great secrets of life is that liberation and lasting peace can never come from anything external – they can only come from within.

Our continued attempts to control life and re-shape it into what we think it should be is what ultimately what keeps us locked into the illusion, running around like a hamster in a wheel.

The Master realizes that we need do very little because, ultimately we’re being done by life itself. Surrendering to this realization, we can allow ourselves to live in accord with the Tao and thus know true freedom.

I was once struck by the title of a Buddhist book which succinctly sums up what I believe is the message of this verse. It was called “Being no one, going nowhere”.

Perhaps the being alone is sufficient.

Please send us an e-mail to request the download link to the MP3 file. – E-mail: info@renewyourmind.co.za.

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81 Week Course to Re-New Your Mind - Tao Te Ching - The Chinese concept of yin and yang describes nature in daulities with two opposite, complementary, and interdependent forces. In other words, two halves balancing together that make a whole.